Saturday, June 14, 2014

Obama Surrendering Iraq To Al-Qaeda’s ISIS-Islamists

Mass-executed Iraqi people of Mosul City.
Thanks to Muslim-Sympathiser and US president Barack Hussein Obama’s policies of Muslim-appeasement the whole Middle East is now going up in flames.

Al-Qaeda affiliated ISIS (Islamic State of Iraq & Syria) terrorists wreaking havoc in Syria and taking over 3 major cities in Iraq and committing atrocious mass-beheadings, now has announced plans to invade Jordan and slaughter King Abdullah, as well as Gaza, the Sinai Peninsula, and Lebanon.

The capture this week by ISIS of the cities of Mosul and Tikrit in Iraq has left many Arabs and Muslims in the region worried that their countries soon may be targeted by the terrorists, who seek to create a radical Islamist Caliphate in the Middle East.

According to the sources, ISIS leader Abu Baker al-Baghdadi recently discussed with his lieutenants the possibility of extending the group’s control beyond Syria and Iraq. One of the ideas discussed envisages focusing ISIS’s efforts on Jordan, where Islamist movements already have a significant presence.

Barack Hussein Obama giving pro-Muslim speech at UNGA.
(He is a born-Muslim since his grand-father was a
Muslim and his father was a Muslim and thus
he will always be a Muslim.)
Jordan was also chosen because it has shared borders with Iraq and Syria, making it easier for the terrorists to infiltrate the kingdom. Jordanian political analyst Oraib al-Rantawi sounded alarm bells by noting that the ISIS threat to move its fight to the kingdom was real and imminent.

“We in Jordan cannot afford the luxury of just waiting and monitoring,” he cautioned. “The danger is getting closer to our bedrooms. It has become a strategic danger; it is no longer a security threat from groups or cells. We must start thinking outside the box. The time has come to increase coordination and cooperation with the regimes in Baghdad and Damascus to contain the crawling of extremism and terrorism.”

The ISIS terrorists see Jordan’s Western-backed King Abdullah as an enemy of Islam and an infidel, and have publicly called for his execution. ISIS terrorists recently posted a video on YouTube in which they threatened to “slaughter” Abdullah, whom they denounced as a “tyrant.” Some of the terrorists who appeared in the video were Jordanian citizens who tore up their passports in front of the camera and vowed to launch suicide attacks inside the kingdom.

Security sources in Amman expressed deep concern over ISIS’s threats and plans to “invade” the kingdom. The sources said that King Abdullah has requested urgent military aid from the U.S. and other Western countries so that he could foil any attempt to turn Jordan into an Islamist-controlled state.

ISIS mass beheaders in Mosul City, Iraq.
Marwan Shehadeh, an expert on Islamist groups, said he did not rule out the possibility that ISIS would target Jordan because it views the Arab regimes, including Jordan’s Hashemites, as “infidels” and “apostates” who should be fought.

The recent victories by ISIS terrorists in Iraq and Syria have emboldened the group and its followers throughout the Middle East. Now the terrorists are planning to move their jihad not only to Jordan, but also to the Gaza Strip, Sinai and Lebanon.

This is all happening under the watching eyes of the U.S. Administration and Western countries, who seem to be uncertain as to what needs to be done to stop the Islamist terrorists from invading neighboring countries.

ISIS is a threat not only to moderate Arabs and Muslims, but also to Israel, which the terrorists say is their ultimate destination. The U.S. and its Western allies need to wake up quickly and take the necessary measures to prevent the Islamist terrorists from achieving their goal.

Failure to act will result in the establishment in the Middle East of a dangerous extremist Islamist empire that will pose a threat to American and Western interests.

The fall of the Iraqi city of Mosul to the al-Qaeda offshoot ISIS has shown the power of its leader, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi – a former US detainee.

The FBI “most wanted” mugshot shows a tough, swarthy figure, his hair in a jailbird crew-cut. The $10 million price on his head, meanwhile, suggests that whoever released him from US custody four years ago may now be regretting it.

ISIS leader was in US custody but Obama let him go.
Taken during his years as a detainee at the US-run Camp Bucca in southern Iraq, this is the only known photograph of Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the new leader of al-Qaeda in Iraq and Syria. But while he may lack the photogenic qualities of his hero, Osama bin Laden, he is fast becoming the new poster-boy for the global jihadist movement.

Well-organised and utterly ruthless, the Islamist preacher is the driving force behind al-Qaeda’s resurgence throughout Syria and Iraq, putting it at the forefront of the war to topple President Bashar al-Assad and starting a fresh campaign of mayhem against the Western-backed government in Baghdad.

On Tuesday, his forces achieved their biggest coup in Iraq to date, seizing control of government buildings in Mosul, the country’s third biggest city. Coming on top of similar operations in January that planted the black jihadi flag in the towns of Fallujah and Ramadi, it gives al-Qaeda control of large swathes of the north and west of the country, and poses the biggest security crisis since the US pull-out two years ago.

But who is exactly is the man who is threatening to plunge Iraq back to its darkest days, and why has he become so effective?

As with many of al-Qaeda’s leaders, precise details are sketchy. His FBI rap sheet offers little beyond the fact that he is aged around 42, and was born as Ibrahim Ali al-Badri in the city of Samarrah, which lies on a palm-lined bend in the Tigris north of Baghdad. Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi is a nom de guerre, as is his other name, Abu Duaa, which translates roughly as “Father of the Summons”.

Some describe him as a farmer who was arrested by US forces during a mass sweep in 2005, who then became radicalised at Camp Bucca, where many al-Qaeda commanders were held. Others, though, believe he was a radical even during the largely secular era of Saddam Hussein, and became a prominent al-Qaeda player very shortly after the US invasion.

“This guy was a Salafi (a follower of a fundamentalist brand of Islam), and Saddam’s regime would have kept a close eye on him,” said Dr Michael Knights, an Iraq expert at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy. “He was also in Camp Bucca for several years, which suggests he was already considered a serious threat when he went in there.”

That theory seems backed by US intelligence reports from 2005, which describe him as al-Qaeda’s point man in Qaim, a fly-blown town in Iraq’s western desert. “Abu Duaa was connected to the intimidation, torture and murder of local civilians in Qaim”, says a Pentagon document. “He would kidnap individuals or entire families, accuse them, pronounce sentence and then publicly execute them.”

Why such a ferocious individual was deemed fit for release in 2009 is not known. One possible explanation is that he was one of thousands of suspected insurgents granted amnesty as the US began its draw down in Iraq. Another, though, is that rather like Keyser Söze, the enigmatic crimelord in the film The Usual Suspects, he may actually be several different people.

“We either arrested or killed a man of that name about half a dozen times, he is like a wraith who keeps reappearing, and I am not sure where fact and fiction meet,” said Lieutenant-General Sir Graeme Lamb, a former British special forces commander who helped US efforts against al-Qaeda in Iraq. “There are those who want to promote the idea that this man is invincible, when it may actually be several people using the same nom de guerre.”

What does seem clear, however, is that al-Qaeda now has its most formidable leadership since Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, the Jordanian who kidnapped the British hostage, Ken Bigley, and who died in a missile strike in 2006.

When al-Baghdadi was announced as a new leader in 2010 – following the killing of two other top commanders – al-Qaeda was seriously on the back foot, not just in Iraq but regionwide.

In former strongholds like Fallujah, its fighters had been routed after their brutality sparked a rebellion by local tribes. In Pakistan and Afghanistan, drone strikes were destroying the cream of its senior leadership. And the following year, the onset of the Arab Spring revolutions, with their emphasis on democracy and human rights, made it look simply irrelevant.

Indeed, when bin Laden himself was killed in May 2011, Baghdadi’s pledge to revenge his death with 100 terrorist attacks across Iraq looked like little more than bluster. Today, he is already well past that target, thanks to a devastating campaign of car bombings and Mumbai-style killing sprees that has pushed Iraq’s death toll back up to around 1,000 per month.

“Baghdadi is actually more capable than the man he took over from,” said Dr Knights. “It’s one of those unfortunate situations where taking out the previous leadership has made things worse, not better.”

Quietly-spoken and publicity-shy, Baghdadi is said to be fond of turning up on frontline operations himself. Mindful, though, of the price on his head — second only to the $25m reward for al-Qaeda’s No 1, Ayman al Zawahari – he takes extensive precautions. Fighters who have met him speak of a shadowy figure who can mimic a number of regional accents to blend in. In the company of all but the closest devotees, he wears a mask to prevent anyone getting a close look at him.

His greatest coup so far was to free around 500 of his most loyal supporters during a spectacular jail break last July at Baghdad’s Abu Ghraib prison, supposedly the most-heavily guarded facility in the country. It is a trick he is believed to have repeated this week in Mosul, where three jails holding at least 1,000 militants were “liberated”.

Many of those freed in the earlier Abu Ghraib break out in July are believed to have headed to neighbouring Syria, where they have proved decisive in turning al-Qaeda into the pre-eminent rebel movement in the fight against President Assad.

Iraq is falling to the same Islamic jihadists who are fighting to take over Syria (supported in part by the U.S.) and the ISIS Jihadis loot $429 million from the city’s Central Bank to make ISIS (Islamic State of Iraq & Syria) the world’s richest terrorist organization.

ISIS is even more savage and barbaric than al-Qaeda. Not only banning Music and dancing ISIS Islamists also forced all females to cover up whole body and stay inside. The women and girls are also banned from sitting on chairs.

Obama-armed ISIS Islamist Army of Syria.
The Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) has become the richest terror group ever after looting 500 billion Iraqi dinars – the equivalent of $429m (£256m) – from Mosul’s central bank, according to the regional governor. Nineveh governor Atheel al-Nujaifi confirmed Kurdish televison reports that Isis militants had stolen millions from numerous banks across Mosul. A large quantity of gold bullion is also believed to have been stolen.

Following the siege of the country’s second city, the bounty collected by the group has left it richer than al-Qaeda itself and as wealthy as small nations such as Tonga, Kiribati, the Marshall Islands and the Falkland Islands. The financial assets that Isis now possesses are likely to worsen the Iraqi governement’s struggle to defeat the insurgency, which is aimed at creating an Islamic state across the Syrian-Iraqi border.

The Islamist militants took control of Mosul after hundreds of its fighters overwhelmed government  military forces in a lightening attack on Monday, forcing up to 500,000 people to flee the city and Iraqi prime minister Nouri al-Maliki to call a national state of emergency. The militants freed up to 1,000 inmates from Mosul’s central prison, according to senior police officials. They are also in control of Mosul airport and local television stations.

They also seized considerable amounts of US-supplied military hardware. Photos have already emerged of Isis parading captured Humvees in neighbouring Syria where they are also waging war against President Bashar al-Assad’s regime.

Brutal mass-execution of Iraqi Army soldiers by Islamists.
Iraqi police and security forces reportedly fled Mosul prior to the attack, leaving the facilities of the city open for plunder. Mosul was a key area of focus for U.S. forces in an effect to stabilize Iraq, and a large amount of military hardware was left in the city for the Iraqis.

Iraq’s parliament speaker said that ISIS took control of the city’s airport and obtained helicopters. ISIS also took control of U.S. Humvees, which they are now proceeding to send to Syria.

Upwards of 150,000 people are now fleeing from Mosul towards Baghdad or Iraqi Kurdistan. U.S. trained Iraqi soldiers are apparently leaving behind their uniforms too as they flee from ISIS.

In a televised news conference, Maliki said “Iraq is undergoing a difficult stage” and urged the public and government to unite “to confront this vicious attack, which will spare no Iraqi.” The US State Department has released a statement saying that it is “deeply concerned” by the Islamist militants’ siege of Mosul. (Deeply concerned? You were in such a big hurry to get out of there)

“The situation remains extremely serious. Senior U.S. officials in both Washington and Baghdad are tracking events closely in coordination with the Government of Iraq,” the statement read. “The United States stands with the Iraqi people,” it continued. (No, it doesn’t, Obama stands with the jihadists).

ISIS captured the city Falluja, 40 miles west of Baghdad, in January and currently controls large swathes of northern Iraq.

The Iraqi government has launched a number of failed assaults on the city leaving hopes of retaking Mosul slim.  An Iraqi army officer told the Independent: “We can’t beat them.” “They’re trained in street fighting and we’re not. We need a whole army to drive them out of Mosul. They’re like ghosts; they appear to hit and disappear within seconds.”

Obama-supported ISIS Islamist army of Syria is now marching to Baghdad.

The conflict that's embroiled Islamic militants against the Iraqi government poses an "existential threat" to the United States, warns Sen. John McCain.

A surge in hostility in Iraq over the past several days has resulted in the fall of cities and regions to militants fighting with the Islamic State of Iraq in Syria (ISIS). McCain said the United States should heed the ramifications of the conflict because of the threat it poses to America's national security.

John McCain Calling for Obama's National
Security Team be fired immediately.
"We are now facing an existential threat to the security of the United States of America," the Arizona Republican told MSNBC's "Morning Joe" on Friday. "This has turned into one of the most serious threats to American security in recent history."

McCain charged that "everyone in the national security team" of President Barack Obama should be fired. He suggested the president should bring in "the guys that won the war" in Iraq, Gen. David Petraeus and Gen. Jack Keane, to "devise a strategy, and then implement it with tactics."

"I know that this team that [Obama's] got around him now ought to be fired," McCain said. "They have been a total failure."

McCain admitted there are "no good options right now" for dealing with the hostility and said he didn't feel U.S. air strikes in Iraq were necessarily the answer. The entire conflict is something McCain said he predicted in 2011 when Obama made the decision to pull troops out of Iraq without leaving a residual force.

"If we left the residual force behind that we could have, we would not be facing the crisis that we are today. Those are fundamental facts," he said.

McCain defended the idea of a residual force in Iraq because the United States has kept residual forces in other countries like Korea, Germany, Japan, and Bosnia.

"A residual force would have stabilized the country. Most military experts will tell you that," he said. "You ignore history of what we've done after conflicts, which is to leave a stabilizing force behind, which is what we could have done in Iraq and avoided this debacle that we are in today."

(Video of ISIS Islamists' executing and beheading Iraqi policemen and soldiers.)